Internationally acclaimed artist Kiki Smith currently has a solo show at the Neuberger Museum of Art at Purchase College. Comprised almost entirely of new work, it points the way to a new focus in her work: an engagement with nature, spirit and the imagination.


On Twitter, @kukkurovaca just tweeted that this André Masson painting reminds him of this. Just more proof that the Internet IS changing our perception of modern art, and vice versa… ;-)

On Twitter, @kukkurovaca just tweeted that this André Masson painting reminds him of this. Just more proof that the Internet IS changing our perception of modern art, and vice versa… ;-)

NYC-ARTS Top Five: February 21-27: Jubilation|Rumination: Life, Real and Imagined

S.A. Shute (1803–1836) and R.W. Shute (1803–1882), Joseph Gilman Parker, Lowell, Massachusetts, 1832
American Folk Art Museum, gift of Steven and Helen Kellogg

Video we <3:

Sophie Blackall’s Illustrations of Craigslist Missed Connections

This episode of Etsy’s Handmade Portraits series, directed by Alex Rappoport, profiles an artist who finds inspiration in the stories of strangers trying to find one another on the Internet after a chance encounter. Sophie Blackall’s whimsical paintings illustrate Craigslist’s Missed Connections posts in humorous ways, perhaps interpreting their details more literally than the authors intended. Her illustrations have been published as a book and are available on Etsy, of course.

via theatlanticvideo

aidahrasheed:

Rashid Johnson “Makes Things to Put Things On”

© Art21, Inc.

How does an artist contribute his own personal story in the face of prevailing historical narratives? In this film, Rashid Johnson discusses the fluid nature of black identity in America and its escapist tendencies, from the Afrocentric politics of Marcus Garvey to the cosmic philosophy of Sun Ra. Johnson’s invented secret society—”The New Negro Escapist Social and Athletic Club”—is a framework through which the artist humorously upends, through repetition and juxtaposition, conventional expectations of historical influence and legacy. Inspired by a story by the artist Lawrence Weiner in which one character says to another that “a table is something to put something on,” Johnson creates sculptures of shelf-like structures from materials such as black wax, mirror, tile, and branded wood. Each structure is filled with culturally resonant objects—such as Miles Davis and Ramsey Lewis jazz records, books by comedians Dick Gregory and Bill Cosby, and treatises by scholars such as W.E.B. Du Bois and Debra J. Dickerson—as well as the artist’s own photographs and hand-made objects. Featuring works from the exhibitions “The Dead Lecturer” (2008) and “Other Aspects” (2009-10), as well as works-in-progress in the artist’s Williamsburg studio.